The Faintest Ink

is better than the best memory

370 notes &

We support Fair Use of our music!
We were upset to find out that a lecture by Professor Lawrence Lessig titled ‘Open’ was removed from YouTube without review, under the mistaken belief that it infringed our copyright interests.
This lecture about Fair-Use included -as examples- bits of spontaneous fan videos using our song Lisztomania.
Not only do we welcome the illustrative use of our music for educational purposes, but, more broadly, we encourage people getting inspired and making their own versions of our songs and videos and posting the result online.
One of the great beauties of the digital era is to liberate spontaneous creativity - it might be a chaotic space of free association sometimes but the contemporary experience of digital re-mediation is enormously liberating.
We don’t feel the least alienated by this; appropriation and recontextualization is a long-standing behavior that has just been made easier and more visible by the ubiquity of internet.
In a few words: We absolutely support Fair Use of our music,
and we can only encourage a new copyright policy that protects Fair Use as much as every creators’ legitimate interests.
PHOENIX
Phoenix 

421 notes &

quartzcity:

discardingimages:

trumpet noseBible, France ca. 1270-1290.
Bibliothèque d’Agglomération de Saint-Omer, Ms. 5, fol. 246r

In all of the discussion about looking for evidence of time travel, did anyone consider a time-traveling Dr. Seuss?

quartzcity:

discardingimages:

trumpet nose

Bible, France ca. 1270-1290.

Bibliothèque d’Agglomération de Saint-Omer, Ms. 5, fol. 246r

In all of the discussion about looking for evidence of time travel, did anyone consider a time-traveling Dr. Seuss?

0 notes &

Post Position » No Code: Null Programs

To continue the productive discussion of uninscribed artworks in Craig Dworkin’s No Medium, this report discusses, in detail, those computer programs that have no code, and are thus empty or null. Several specific examples that have been offered in different contexts (the demoscene, obfuscated coding, a programming challenge, etc.) are analyzed. The concept of a null program is discussed with reference to null strings and files. This limit case of computing shows that both technical and cultural means of analysis are important to a complete understanding of programs – even in the unusual case that they lack code.

53 notes &

jamesurbaniak:

It’s the last day of Hal Hartley’s Kickstarter for “Ned Rifle,” the final film in the “Henry Fool” trilogy. For obvious reasons, this is a project near and dear to my heart. Hal is one of the most important artistic collaborators of my life. The Kickstarter is picking up steam in its final hours but we’re not there yet. Any amount helps. I really hope this happens.

Eight people dropped $2500 on lunch with Parker Posey, but no one wants lunch with James Urbaniak?!

jamesurbaniak:

It’s the last day of Hal Hartley’s Kickstarter for “Ned Rifle,” the final film in the “Henry Fool” trilogy. For obvious reasons, this is a project near and dear to my heart. Hal is one of the most important artistic collaborators of my life. The Kickstarter is picking up steam in its final hours but we’re not there yet. Any amount helps. I really hope this happens.

Eight people dropped $2500 on lunch with Parker Posey, but no one wants lunch with James Urbaniak?!

0 notes &

The collapse of the industrial sector in the US smashed up against the ubiquity of internet accessibility and online commerce, along with improved manufacturing techniques in materials means this is the best time ever to get a costume with wings.

Jason Scott, A Thing with Feathers

2 notes &

It’s harder to imagine the past that went away than it is to imagine the future. What we were prior to our latest batch of technology is, in a way, unknowable. It would be harder to accurately imagine what New York City was like the day before the advent of broadcast television than to imagine what it will be like after life-size broadcast holography comes online. But actually the New York without the television is more mysterious, because we’ve already been there and nobody paid any attention. That world is gone.

My great-grandfather was born into a world where there was no recorded music. It’s very, very difficult to conceive of a world in which there is no possibility of audio recording at all. Some people were extremely upset by the first Edison recordings. It nauseated them, terrified them. It sounded like the devil, they said, this evil unnatural technology that offered the potential of hearing the dead speak. We don’t think about that when we’re driving somewhere and turn on the radio. We take it for granted.

William Gibson (via erikostrom)

(via erikostrom)